Distance Education https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/ en Criminal Justice Instructor Chris Polzer wins 2020 Distinguished Alumni Award https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/criminal-justice-instructor-chris-polzer-wins-2020-distinguished-alumni-award <span property="schema:name">Criminal Justice Instructor Chris Polzer wins 2020 Distinguished Alumni Award </span> <span rel="schema:author"><span lang="" about="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/user/14" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" xml:lang="">Alison S Parkins</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-11-11T22:07:51+00:00">Wed, 11/11/2020 - 16:07</span> <div class="field field--name-field-news-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/alumni" hreflang="en">Alumni</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/distance-education" hreflang="en">Distance Education</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/graduate-studies" hreflang="en">Graduate Studies</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/law-justice" hreflang="en">Law & Justice</a></div> </div> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><em><span><span>Two-time University of Wisconsin-Platteville graduate and Criminal Justice Instructor Chris Polzer was named one of the university’s 2020 Distinguished Alumni. Recipients of the honor, which is presented by the Alumni Association, are chosen for their contributions to and recognition in their professions and communities, and continued engagement with the university.</span></span></em></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><em><span><span>Polzer earned his bachelor’s degree in criminal justice in 1988 and his master’s degree in guidance and counseling in 1992. After more than 25 years with the Federal Bureau of Prisons—working in roles including Equal Employment Opportunity counselor, drug treatment specialist, certified hostage negotiator, and diversity management instructor—he retired and now teaches criminal justice online and in-person for UW-Platteville. </span></span></em></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><em><span><span>In addition to teaching, Polzer served on the Alumni Association’s Alumni Board of Directors for several years, guest lectured on campus, and participated in the Criminal Justice Career Day, including serving as a keynote speaker. In 2012, he received the Pioneer in Criminal Justice Award and in 2019, the LAE Professional Development Award. Polzer was also selected as the 2020 UW-Platteville College of Liberal Arts and Education commencement speaker. Outside of teaching, Polzer serves on several community and professional boards and is a student mentor. </span></span></em></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>What are you up to now?</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>In December of 2016, I retired after 25-plus years with the federal Bureau of Prisons. I am currently on four different boards—Columbia County Board of Supervisors, Village of Poynette Board of Trustees, Madison College Board of Directors, and I am the Chairman of Columbia County Crime Stoppers.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>I teach various classes depending on the term; I am currently teaching Juvenile Justice online at UW-Platteville. I was also in the classroom at UW-Platteville last spring, but we all know what happened there! I hope to continue and expand my teaching career moving forward.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>You received both your undergraduate and graduate degree at UW-Platteville. Why did this university appeal to you?</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>I was asked to leave UW-Madison after three semesters due to some “misunderstandings.” The Criminal Justice program at UW-Platteville was well recognized, and I was interested in a career in law enforcement. I visited Platteville in the summer and met with an individual by the name of Joe Lomax—he remains a mentor to me to this day. I attended graduate school due to the opportunity I received from the Student Housing Department and became a Resident Director. I am forever grateful to Rich Egley for the opportunity. My ultimate goal was federal law enforcement—which I am pleased to say worked out.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Why did you want to start teaching at UW-Platteville?</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>I began by being a guest speaker in the CJ Department—Mr. Lomax and Dr.’s Cheryl Fuller and Amy Nemmetz provided me those opportunities. I believe I may have initially missed my calling (and passion)—if I had it to do over again, I would have become a history professor! Note: I recently spoke to Dr. Nemmetz’s Foundations of Corrections class—very refreshing and reminded me how much I miss being in the classroom. Again, I enjoy spending time on the UW-Platteville campus, including interacting with students and attending alumni events.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Can you tell me about your time on the Alumni Association’s Alumni Board of Directors?</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Being on the Alumni Board of Directors was one of the smartest things I’ve done. I love being on the UW-Platteville campus and enjoy giving back as well. This includes visiting campus as often as possible, and Homecoming is always a highlight for me as well as my wife and family. I made lifelong friends (including Dan Smith, Sue Lindholm, and Dave Smutzler), and enjoyed my involvement with the Board of Directors immensely. Unfortunately, due to my employment with UW-Platteville and the change in the UW System Regent by-laws, I was no longer allowed to do both.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Why is maintaining a connection to UW-Platteville as an alumnus important to you?</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>I am so passionate about maintaining a connection to UW-Platteville for several reasons, and this includes “giving back.” This university gave me a second chance, provided me with an excellent academic and social atmosphere, and always stood behind me. In addition, I value volunteerism</span></span></span><span><span><span>—<span>including giving back by being a guest speaker in various classes. Giving back, in my opinion, doesn’t just mean financially</span>—<span>we have incredible alumni from all disciplines of study</span>—<span>I see them as one of our most valuable resources. That said, I also value all of our students</span>—<span>another reason I enjoy teaching so much, as well as being on campus. My passion for teaching also plays a role in this. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>What does it mean to win the 2020 </span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></span><strong>Distinguished Alumni Award</strong><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>?</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>I view this as a complicated question—the nomination process is incredible and with many moving parts. I was notified on a Friday afternoon by Aaron Athas, Alumni Association Board President. Quite frankly, I am still somewhat in shock, but I doubt I will ever forget receiving the phone call. The exact meaning hasn’t quite hit me yet. From a personal perspective, at various times I would never have thought it possible. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>How do you like to spend your time outside of work?</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Being retired does provide me with much more flexibility. Along with the board activities already mentioned, I volunteer once a week with a student I mentor in a Madison school. Prior to COVID-19, this was one of my most rewarding experiences. I have recently begun doing more writing, and I also consider myself a cigar aficionado. The organizations (boards) I mentioned above keep me quite busy.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Is there anything else you’d like to add?</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>I am extremely honored and humbled to have been selected as a Distinguished Alumni. I have a great deal of gratitude for the many people who have assisted me along the way, but I haven’t been able to mention them all here. I would like to add my wife, Pamela, to that group; I could not have accomplished any of my successes without her support. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p> </p></div> Wed, 11 Nov 2020 22:07:51 +0000 Alison S Parkins 1420 at https://www.uwplatt.edu/news https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/criminal-justice-instructor-chris-polzer-wins-2020-distinguished-alumni-award#comments UW-Platteville continues to be a pioneer in distance education https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/uw-platteville-continues-be-pioneer-distance-education <span property="schema:name">UW-Platteville continues to be a pioneer in distance education</span> <span rel="schema:author"><span lang="" about="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/user/14" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" xml:lang="">Alison S Parkins</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-11-09T15:14:14+00:00">Mon, 11/09/2020 - 09:14</span> <div class="field field--name-field-news-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/campus-community" hreflang="en">Campus & Community</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/distance-education" hreflang="en">Distance Education</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/graduate-studies" hreflang="en">Graduate Studies</a></div> </div> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The University of Wisconsin-Platteville is known as the Pioneers, but the moniker is much more than a nickname. The university has been a pioneer and industry leader in distance education since 1978, when it began offering degrees through its print-based program.</p> <p>“Nobody else in the UW System was doing this, and there were very few programs out there across the country,” said Susan Hansen, the interim Dean for the <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/college/division-professional-studies">Division of Professional Studies</a>. “The instructors and the support that was provided to those students kind of stole the show and helped those programs grow.”</p> <p>Without a road map to reference, the first distance education recruiters pounded the pavement to sell the programs to potential students. As the reputation of the print-based program grew, so did the number of students and degree programs.</p> <p>“At the time, our print program was very unique across the state, as well as really across the country. The program was housed in the Department of Business and was for a business administration completion degree. Nobody in the system had done this, nobody in Wisconsin had done this.”</p> <p>Hansen has seen first-hand how the distance programs have grown, developed and thrived over the years. When she first arrived at UW-Platteville in 1991, she taught a print-based business course.</p> <p>“Since I had never taken a distance course, I didn’t quite know how to go about relating to students that I would never see in person or even necessarily talk to in person,” Hansen said. “I spent a lot of time thinking about my feedback on student papers and student homework.”</p> <p>The print-based program was the main vehicle for delivering distance education in the first 20 years it was offered through UW-Platteville. As technology developed, the university stayed on the cutting edge. In 1999, the institution became the first public university in Wisconsin to offer degrees online.</p> <p>“The internet allowed us to make our courses more robust. We’ve gained access beyond what we ever imagined in any history since the printing press,” Hansen said. “I think the key to making distance education successful is that it allows us to teach in different ways, with interactive activities, interactive discussions, videos and guided presentations.”</p> <p>Because the university blazed the trail for delivering distance education, the university has often served as a model for other institutions looking to establish their own programs. However, Hansen said the key to UW-Platteville’s stance as an industry leader and innovator is a need to evolve.</p> <p>“I think what helps us stand out is that we’ve done this for a long time, and we’re always changing. We’re always looking for the next way to provide a really robust and solid education,” Hansen said. “Our focus has always been on the quality of the education, the quality of the knowledge, quality of the instructor, and finding new ways to engage with students. It’s a constant process. And I think that dedication to that ideal is what makes us stand out.”</p> <p>UW-Platteville also continues to evolve its programs to make students both more knowledgeable and marketable by focusing on specialization within its programs.</p> <p>“What companies and employers want are people that have focused in and developed advanced knowledge in specialized areas. In the case of the <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/information-systems-management">M.S. Information Systems</a> or <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/master-strategic-management">M.S. Strategic Management </a>programs, our degrees are in much more demand than a generic MBA,” Hansen explained. “We also have a growth of individuals in the student population that need to retool their skills to adapt to business changes.”</p> <p>Hansen said there are a plethora of reasons students seek an online education over a traditional on-campus experience. UW-Platteville’s online programs are intentionally designed to be asynchronous, allowing students to take classes to fit around their busy schedules. She added that the education model is also easier for some learners.</p> <p>UW-Platteville’s place amongst the best in distance education institutions is cemented by its ability to produce knowledgeable and capable graduates. Thousands of students have earned their distance degrees through UW-Platteville since 1978. Currently, more than 1630 students are taking online classes through UW-Platteville’s <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/department/center-distance-learning">Center for Distance Learning</a>. This includes students from 48 states and nine countries, including Canada, Jamaica, Saudi Arabia and Switzerland.</p> <p>UW-Platteville offers 10 undergraduate degrees including, <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/associate-arts-and-sciences-online">Associate of Arts and Sciences</a>; <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/associate-science-business-administration-online">Associate of Science in Business Administration</a>; <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/applied-arts-and-sciences">Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences</a>; <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/applied-computing">Bachelor of Science in Applied Computing</a>; and <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/bachelor-criminal-justice">Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice</a>, plus Bachelor's of Business Administration in <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/finance">Finance</a>; <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/human-resource-management">Human Resource Management</a>; <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/integrated-marketing">Integrated Marketing</a>; <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/integrated-supply-chain-management">Integrated Supply Chain Management</a>; and <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/management">Management</a>. The 10 master’s degree programs are <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/applied-biotechnology">Applied Biotechnology</a>, <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/master-criminal-justice">Criminal Justice</a>; <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/master-science-cybersecurity">Cybersecurity</a>; <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/engineering">Engineering</a>; <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/healthcare-administration">Healthcare Administration</a>; <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/information-systems-management">Information Systems Management</a>, <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/master-integrated-supply-chain-management">Integrated Supply Chain Management</a>; <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/master-organizational-change-leadership">Organizational Change Leadership</a>;<a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/master-project-management"> Project Management</a>, and <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/master-strategic-management">Strategic Management</a>.</p> <p>To learn more about the University of Wisconsin-Platteville’s online programs, visit <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/department/center-distance-learning">Go.UWPlatt.Edu/Online</a>.</p> <p> </p></div> Mon, 09 Nov 2020 15:14:14 +0000 Alison S Parkins 1411 at https://www.uwplatt.edu/news https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/uw-platteville-continues-be-pioneer-distance-education#comments 2020 Distance Education Scholarship winners announced https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/2020-distance-education-scholarship-winners-announced <span property="schema:name">2020 Distance Education Scholarship winners announced</span> <span rel="schema:author"><span lang="" about="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/user/14" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" xml:lang="">Alison S Parkins</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-11-09T14:42:35+00:00">Mon, 11/09/2020 - 08:42</span> <div class="field field--name-field-news-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/alumni" hreflang="en">Alumni</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/distance-education" hreflang="en">Distance Education</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/graduate-studies" hreflang="en">Graduate Studies</a></div> </div> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span>The Center for Distance Learning is proud to announce the 2020 winners of the Dawn Drake Excellence in Distance Education Scholarship, Gary Apperson Memorial Scholarship, and Ruth Miller Challenge Scholarship. The scholarships, which are awarded each year to students enrolled in distance education programs, were created to provide additional financial support for UW-Platteville students.</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>The 2020 </span></span><a href="https://uwplatt.academicworks.com/opportunities/3297"><span>Dawn Drake Excellence in Distance Education Scholarship</span></a><span><span> was awarded to <strong>Crystal Yang</strong>, who is pursuing her </span></span><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/master-organizational-change-leadership"><span>Master of Science in Organizational Change Leadership</span></a><span><span>. Drake was a true Pioneer in distance and online education, and was central in developing the university’s first online programs. She oversaw distance and continuing education at UW-Platteville from 1999, with the creation of Distance Learning Center (now Center for Distance Learning), until her retirement in 2018. Drake’s passion lies in making quality education as available and accessible as possible, and her scholarship provides one $750 award each year.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span>Joshua Odegard</span></span></strong><span><span>, a student in the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration program, was selected for the 2020 </span></span><a href="https://uwplatt.academicworks.com/opportunities/994"><span>Ruth Miller Distance Education Challenge Scholarship</span></a><span><span>. The $750 scholarship is awarded each year to one UW-Platteville student earning a bachelor’s degree in business administration at a distance. Ruth Miller was one of the university’s first distance education graduates, earning her Bachelor of Science in Business Administration in 1982 via print-based courses. She was a single working parent while completing her degree, so she created her eponymous scholarship to help students pursuing a degree while balancing other aspects of life, such as parenthood, financial challenges and careers.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span>The 2020 </span></span><a href="https://uwplatt.academicworks.com/opportunities/2016"><span>Gary Apperson Memorial Scholarship</span></a><span><span> was awarded to <strong>Jessie Geurts</strong>, who is pursuing a </span></span><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/department/center-distance-learning/graduate-criminal-justice-requirements"><span>Master of Science in Criminal Justice</span></a><span><span>. Apperson graduated from the program in 2006 and later taught criminal justice online for the university. Previously, he served on the Anchorage, Alaska, police force from 1977–2002. Apperson was very involved as an alumnus and received an award in 2014 for his volunteer efforts with UW-Platteville. Teaching and mentoring students were some of his greatest passions, in addition to motorcycling, which he shared with his wife, Deb. Their rides took them throughout Alaska and even to Platteville every few years to see the campus and visit colleagues in person. Sadly, Apperson passed away in January of 2017. His family, friends, and colleagues created this $1,000 yearly scholarship to carry on his legacy and enthusiasm for education, mentoring, and giving back. </span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><em>To contribute to student scholarships, visit </em><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/give"><em>www.uwplatt.edu/give</em></a><em>.</em></span></span></span></p></div> Mon, 09 Nov 2020 14:42:35 +0000 Alison S Parkins 1405 at https://www.uwplatt.edu/news https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/2020-distance-education-scholarship-winners-announced#comments Pioneer Spotlight: Clint Nemitz https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/pioneer-spotlight-clint-nemitz <span property="schema:name">Pioneer Spotlight: Clint Nemitz</span> <span rel="schema:author"><span lang="" about="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/user/14" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" xml:lang="">Alison S Parkins</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-10-30T11:31:02+00:00">Fri, 10/30/2020 - 06:31</span> <div class="field field--name-field-news-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/campus-community" hreflang="en">Campus & Community</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/distance-education" hreflang="en">Distance Education</a></div> </div> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><em>As the lead admissions specialist for the University of Wisconsin-Platteville Center for Distance Learning, Clint Nemitz works with his team to connect prospective students with their desired academic programs. It’s work Nemitz sets to with a passion, partly because he understands the struggle of finding the right program, as was the case with his own academic journey.  </em></p> <p><em>“My educational path was a winding road to say the least, as most of that time I had more questions than answers,” said Nemitz. “What do I want to do with my life? I have some visions of how I see my life, but how can I get there?”  </em></p> <p><em>These questions were constant throughout Nemitz’s educational journey, and as a result, he took his time completing his degree. After earning his associate degree at UW-Richland Center, Nemitz transferred to UW-Platteville, where he often switched majors before settling on a teaching degree. Because of this experience, Nemitz finds it easy to relate to students who contact the Center for Distance Learning, looking to complete their degree and find their path.</em></p> <p><strong>What do you enjoy most about working for the Center for Distance Learning?</strong></p> <p>I love our team! Anytime you can surround yourself with people who would help you in an instant, it makes life that much easier.  Our team also provides a great service to a lot of people. Online learning provides people with an opportunity to better themselves and meet lifelong goals through high-quality education. Laura Schieltz, Paige Thomas, Stacy Chiaverotti, Joanna Mueller, Rebecca Eck, and Nicole Waterman all have a common trait – they all genuinely love helping people reach their goals. It is hard not to enjoy helping people and they are the best at it.  </p> <p><strong>In your opinion, what has been the most significant change that’s occurred within the department during your time here?</strong></p> <p>The most significant change by far has been the rapid increase in our program offerings. It has required a large amount of staff hours to update websites, communications, program plans, processes, etc. We’ve added two associate degrees, two bachelor programs, and two master’s degrees – not to mention the collaborative programs we take part in with other UW institutions. I saw the staff being stretched and a different kind of stress that I hadn’t seen in our department, but because we have such a strong group with great leadership, we ultimately came out stronger and more prepared to serve a broader range of students.</p> <p><strong>What does a typical day look like for an admission specialist?</strong></p> <p>Our day is built around outreach to our future students. Being the first person a student speaks to is an important role. The student is making a commitment to themselves that will affect them financially and socially for an extended period of time. There is typically a lot of anxiety that goes into making that decision. Our staff is there to alleviate as much of that stress as possible and make their first steps effortless.</p> <p><strong>Has the COVID-19 pandemic affected your responsibilities in any way? If so, how have you adapted to the “new normal”?</strong></p> <p>The pandemic has caused everyone to make shifts in their daily lives, but it is situations like this where you become proud of your work. Our office hasn’t missed a beat. Our staff has been very responsive, and it’s been business as usual. The biggest effect COVID-19 has had on us would be that people are hesitant to get back to school because of the uncertain future. People need to be reminded that the world is still turning. If you have a desire or passion for finishing your bachelor’s or master’s, go for it, regardless of the circumstances.</p> <p><strong>What is one fact about you that people may not know?</strong></p> <p>Coaching has been a passion of mine since I graduated from Cassville High School.  I coached football, basketball, and baseball throughout the years, dating back to my freshman year at UW-Richland. Coaching is a lot like my recruitment job, making connections, and cultivating relationships. I am extremely grateful to UW-Platteville for allowing me to continue my passion of coaching, as my position allows me the flexibility to continue coaching at Southwestern High School.  I like to think that coaching has paid dividends, providing me a platform to help promote UW-Platteville to area youth considering their next steps.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p></div> Fri, 30 Oct 2020 11:31:02 +0000 Alison S Parkins 1389 at https://www.uwplatt.edu/news https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/pioneer-spotlight-clint-nemitz#comments Alumnus and PM instructor speaks about remote technology’s role amid the pandemic https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/alumnus-and-pm-instructor-speaks-about-remote-technologys-role-amid-pandemic <span property="schema:name">Alumnus and PM instructor speaks about remote technology’s role amid the pandemic</span> <span rel="schema:author"><span lang="" about="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/user/14" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" xml:lang="">Alison S Parkins</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-10-12T15:20:09+00:00">Mon, 10/12/2020 - 10:20</span> <div class="field field--name-field-news-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/distance-education" hreflang="en">Distance Education</a></div> </div> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Shawn Belling, like so many others, had to make some adjustments when the Covid-19 pandemic unfolded last March. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Between Belling’s responsibilities as a project management instructor, professional speaker, consultant, and as the chief information officer at Madison College, however, this new task wasn’t without some difficulty—yet Belling was more than up for the challenge.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Fortunately, I’d already had a lot of experience with remote working,” said Belling. “<span>So for me, personally, I was able to adapt quickly. Remote working has</span><span> probably made my professional life easier, because I can context-switch so quickly without having to physically travel.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The University of Wisconsin-Platteville instructor</span></span></span></span> <span><span><span>then expanded his thoughts to the broader field of project management. He noted that, although there have been some adjustments, the nature of the work hasn’t changed, given project managers’ reliance on one core fundamental. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p class="transcript-list-item"><span><span><span>“One of the standing axioms in the profession is that 80 to 90 percent of a project manager’s job is communication,” said Belling.</span><span> “So if you communicate by walking around and speaking with people on your project teams, you've probably altered the way that you do that with tools like Zoom and Slack. The actual responsibilities of project managers haven't changed, it’s only how we accomplish these responsibilities that has.”</span></span></span></p> <p class="transcript-list-item"><span><span><span>That’s not to say project managers as a whole have had an easier time adapting than others, however. While Belling personally handled the transition to virtual work with little difficulty, he’s fully aware that others’ adjustment to the remote environment can greatly differ.</span></span></span></p> <p class="transcript-list-item"><span><span><span>“I’ve found that adaptation can vary tremendously based on a person’s personality,” said Belling. “This shift has been seen as great for some introverts, but on the other hand, ‘Zoom fatigue’ is a real thing and can affect anyone. It just becomes a matter of how we’re executing our responsibilities and managing our attitudes with these new tools.”</span></span></span></p> <p class="transcript-list-item"><span><span><span>The notion that a person’s relationship with remote working is influenced by their previous background and experience was one Belling further advocated at a recent discussion panel with </span><a href="https://www.witwisconsin.com/">Women in Technology Wisconsin</a><span>—</span><span><span>a non-profit organization working to attract and assist women of all ages in technology-related careers. While at the panel, Belling maintained that understanding we may not all be in the same place with remote technology is important to remember.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“You quickly recognize that people have different experiences with remote working and remote learning,” said Belling. “We have people with small children at home while they work, people who are working with high school students at home, and recognizing that diversity with regard to what resources people have at home and what they are having to deal with is key to moving forward.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Outside of speaking engagements and work, Belling himself is moving forward in other endeavors. Shortly after his panel discussion, Belling reached out to a contact to connect the Women in Technology Wisconsin organization with the </span></span></span></span><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/department/women-stem-program"><span><span><span>Women in STEM program</span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span> at UW-Platteville. If successful, the potential cooperation between the two parties could be mutually beneficial, providing even more networking opportunities and resources for women in technology-related careers.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>This potential affiliation is just one of many ways Belling is advocating for a changing work environment amid an already turbulent time for many. Wishing to promote equality in his own workplace at Madison College—based in Madison, Wisconsin—Belling helped form Women in Technology Services, or WITS, a little over a year ago. According to Belling, the initiative aims to make technology services at Madison College an employer of choice for women by increasing awareness of the challenges they face in the workplace.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>This goal is accomplished through training opportunities, events, and weaving social activities into work, all as a way to provide support and remove impediments for female co-workers. The experience has been both a rewarding and enlightening one for Belling, who seeks lessons with an open mind. For example, </span></span></span></span><span><span><span>after a virtual social hour in which some co-workers felt left out of a male-dominated conversation, he reflected he still had room for professional growth.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p class="transcript-list-item"><span><span>“What this teaches me is, simply, what I still need to do,” said Belling. “I need to think about the unintentional mistake that I made as a leader and then intentionally make some changes so that there are different types of opportunities for our groups to socialize and not end up disconnected or disengaged.”</span></span></p> <p class="transcript-list-item"><span><span>But perhaps the most important lesson Belling has realized is that, no matter what changes occur in the work environment, the situation will evolve. He has his sights set on the future, considering what best practices can be retained as we all move forward.</span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Start thinking post-covid,” said Belling. “I think it’s important for people to think about what they have learned—about their team, their work style, their workplace—that they will continue to implement after the pandemic. There have been some things that have really worked well, arrangements that are not traditional, and we should continue doing them because they’re going to provide an even better experience once we return.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div> Mon, 12 Oct 2020 15:20:09 +0000 Alison S Parkins 1345 at https://www.uwplatt.edu/news https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/alumnus-and-pm-instructor-speaks-about-remote-technologys-role-amid-pandemic#comments Time Management Tips from Your Student Advisory Board https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/time-management-tips-your-student-advisory-board <span property="schema:name">Time Management Tips from Your Student Advisory Board</span> <span rel="schema:author"><span lang="" about="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/user/14" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" xml:lang="">Alison S Parkins</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-10-05T18:25:55+00:00">Mon, 10/05/2020 - 13:25</span> <div class="field field--name-field-news-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/distance-education" hreflang="en">Distance Education</a></div> </div> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span>When it comes to managing time and balancing coursework, different things work for different people.  The members of your <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/department/center-distance-learning/student-advisory-board">Student Advisory Board</a> would like to share some tips and ideas that work for us, and we hope it will spark some ideas for you!</span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong>Get Started on the Right Foot</strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span><span><span>Set yourself up for success by ordering textbooks in advance, printing the course calendar, and reading the syllabus.  It also helps to review each course's "Home" section in Canvas from top to bottom.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>During preview week, compile all readings and due dates into one chart for the semester. Not only can the visual representation help pace out the workload, but this familiarizes you with the expectations of each course in its entirety. This is especially helpful when taking more than one class.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Set realistic goals for completing coursework and work to meet those goals.  Develop a plan for which assignments to complete prior to the due date to avoid waiting until the last minute.</span></span></span></li> </ul> <p><span><span><span><strong>Make a Plan</strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span><span><span>Planners and to-do lists can help<strong> </strong>keep track of and manage assignments that are pending, in progress, or complete. Find a system that works for you, whether it's a calendar on your phone, a written calendar, a to-do list app like Microsoft To-Do (available through your campus email), or a combination of these tools.  To-do list apps allow you to create recurring items for repeating tasks, like weekly assignments or regular study sessions.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Customize your schedule and lists to include things outside of coursework such as work duties, home tasks, kids' school and appointments, your significant others' work schedule, etc.</span></span></span></li> </ul> <p><span><span><span><strong>Schedule Study Sessions</strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span><span><span>Look at your schedule a week in advance and plan out time for studying.  Plan days into multiple study sessions with breaks in between.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Share your study schedule with others in your household so they can give you alone time to focus.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>If you have children at home, plan your study sessions in conjunction with their schedules.  For younger kids, plan to study when they are napping or in bed.  For older kids, plan group study sessions where you all work on schoolwork at the same time.</span></span></span></li> </ul> <p><span><span><span><strong>Prepare for Projects</strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span><span><span>Give yourself time to revise and make corrections to assignments.  This is extremely advantageous if you are working ahead and want to revisit submissions prior to the due date.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>If there is a final project, start outlining it at the beginning of the semester. Integrate what you're learning into the project along the way. Then, the last few weeks before the due date can be for editing and refining. Using this approach can help with the feeling of both learning more and producing better projects while being less stressed.</span></span></span></li> </ul> <p><span><span><span><strong>Lean on the People Around You</strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span><span><span>Reach out to classmates or professors with questions around course topics.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Ask for help or clarification before submitting work.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>If there's something going on in your personal life that may affect your coursework, let your instructor know early.  They won't know unless you say something.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Utilize your advisor as a time management coach – they're available to help you figure out what works best for you.</span></span></span></li> </ul> <p><span><span><span><strong>Take Time for Yourself</strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span><span><span>Carve out time in your schedule to relax, even when life is busy.  This could be meditating, running, or whatever else helps manage feelings of stress.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Plan the semester in advance to balance time for other priorities, such as being fully present with loved ones on weekends or special occasions.</span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span>Don't be afraid to say no. It's important to set boundaries so you can take care of yourself and your priorities.</span></span></span></li> </ul></div> Mon, 05 Oct 2020 18:25:55 +0000 Alison S Parkins 1333 at https://www.uwplatt.edu/news https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/time-management-tips-your-student-advisory-board#comments Job Opportunities Abound for Graduates of Online Cybersecurity Master’s Program https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/job-opportunities-abound-graduates-online-cybersecurity-masters-program <span property="schema:name">Job Opportunities Abound for Graduates of Online Cybersecurity Master’s Program</span> <span rel="schema:author"><span lang="" about="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/user/14" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" xml:lang="">Alison S Parkins</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-09-28T18:21:20+00:00">Mon, 09/28/2020 - 13:21</span> <div class="field field--name-field-news-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/distance-education" hreflang="en">Distance Education</a></div> </div> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>As we continue to navigate through the challenging times posed by COVID-19, it’s not hard to notice the lessons we can learn from a viral pandemic as it relates to prevalent cyber-attacks. Just as a real virus can spread among people, cyber viruses can easily spread between computers and systems in today’s interconnected digital world, which has given rise to exponential growth in cyber-attacks every year. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span>Cybercrime has become a persistent and increasing threat to the interests of individuals, businesses, and governments. To meet the ever-growing demand for effective cybersecurity operations, public and private sector organizations require a highly educated and diverse workforce. However, the supply of cybersecurity professionals has fallen far short of the demand. In early 2019, research and advising company </span><a href="https://www.gartner.com/en/human-resources/research/talentneuron/cybersecurity-labor-shortage-and-covid-19">Gartner</a><span> predicted a global shortage of two million cybersecurity professionals by the end of 2019. Covid-19 has only further exacerbated the problem.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>According to data from analytics company </span></span></span><a href="https://www.burning-glass.com/wp-content/uploads/recruiting_watchers_cybersecurity_hiring.pdf"><span><span><span>BurningGlass</span></span></span></a><span><span><span>, there were over 789,656 job postings in cybersecurity nationwide from September 2017 to August 2018. The number grew  94% since 2013, compared to only 30% for IT job openings overall. Of the postings for cybersecurity positions, 88% require a bachelor’s degree or higher. </span></span></span><br /> <br /> <span><span><span><span>As predicted by </span></span></span></span><a href="https://cybersecurityventures.com/jobs/"><span><span><span>Cybersecurity Ventures</span></span></span></a><span><span><span><span>, there will be around 3.5 million job openings in cybersecurity by 2021. </span></span></span></span><span><span><span>The </span></span></span><a href="https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/information-security-analysts.htm"><span><span><span>U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics</span></span></span></a><span><span><span> notes that information security is projected to grow 32% from 2018 to 2028, which is much faster than the average growth of all occupations in the U.S.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>The University Professional and Continuing Education Association (UPCEA) Center for Research and Marketing Strategy researched both the nation and Wisconsin state market for a degree in cybersecurity in 2019. Key findings from the report:</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span><span><span><span><span>In the state of Wisconsin, cybersecurity-related jobs are projected to grow by 9% over the next decade. Computer-user support specialists for cybersecurity are expected to have the highest number of job openings in the state (1,180). Nationwide, the number of cybersecurity positions is expected to grow by 13%. </span></span></span></span></span><br />  </li> <li><span><span><span><span><span>Nationwide, the median annual earnings for cybersecurity occupations range from $50,738 for Computer User Support Specialists, which requires no degree, to $132,723 for Computer and Information Systems Managers, which requires a bachelor’s degree for entry into the field.</span></span> <span><span>The median annual salary for cybersecurity occupations with typical entry-level education of a bachelor’s degree or more is over $80,000.</span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>To provide opportunities for working professionals and recent graduates interested in a career change, the University of Wisconsin-Platteville is one of eight academic partners working collaboratively on a fully online Master of Science in Cybersecurity program through the University of Wisconsin Extended Campus.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>The online Master of Science in Cybersecurity program is intentionally designed to prepare students to advance their careers and pursue their academic ambitions within the cybersecurity field. Graduates will leave equipped with the skills needed to effectively develop, implement, and maintain a security strategy within diverse organizations and industry sectors. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>The program represents a fully asynchronous curriculum comprised of 34 credits, including a culminating, project-based Capstone experience. Seven core courses provide students with a solid foundation in data and network security, compliance, strategic planning, program design and management, legal and ethical issues in cybersecurity, cryptography, risk management, and technical communications. Also, the program offers four unique tracks to assist students in tailoring their coursework to meet their career goals: digital forensics, cyber response, governance and leadership, and security architecture.</span></span></span> </span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Graduates of the program will gain the major competencies required to assume a variety of roles across a wide range of industries, including cybersecurity analyst, security consultant, cybersecurity manager, vulnerability analyst, security architect, security application developer, information technology specialist, and more.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>If you want to secure your position in a highly sought-after career in cybersecurity, check out the curriculum and admission requirements of our online master program at</span></span></span> <a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/master-science-cybersecurity">go.uwplatt.edu/cybersecurity</a>. </span></span></span></p></div> Mon, 28 Sep 2020 18:21:20 +0000 Alison S Parkins 1309 at https://www.uwplatt.edu/news https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/job-opportunities-abound-graduates-online-cybersecurity-masters-program#comments UW-Platteville Online Advisor Earns Award for Excellence https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/uw-platteville-online-advisor-earns-award-excellence <span property="schema:name">UW-Platteville Online Advisor Earns Award for Excellence</span> <span rel="schema:author"><span lang="" about="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/user/14" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" xml:lang="">Alison S Parkins</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-09-22T11:45:31+00:00">Tue, 09/22/2020 - 06:45</span> <div class="field field--name-field-news-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/campus-community" hreflang="en">Campus & Community</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/distance-education" hreflang="en">Distance Education</a></div> </div> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Nicole Ruchotzke may be one of the newest advisors to join the University of Wisconsin-Platteville Center for Distance Operations, but she’s already left her mark. This week, Ruchotzke will officially be awarded the Advising Profession Impact Award by the Wisconsin Academic Advising Association.<br /> <br /> The award is granted to advisors who have five or fewer years of experience in advising but have significantly impacted their campus.<br /> <br /> Ruchotzke has certainly lived up to that billing. Since starting at UW-Platteville three-and-a-half years ago, she has been instrumental in streamlining the process for taking online and print courses through the Center for Distance Operations. She also authored two grants that provide funding for scholarships and equipment for Continuing Education Institute classes. </span></span></span><br /> <br /> <span><span>“In my day-to-day advising role, I work with seven different student populations, including incarcerated students. I help them to navigate limited resources and point them in the direction needed to better themselves upon their release,” said Ruchotzke. “My dynamic role has allowed me to assist a range of students and positively impact their lives.  It is just a matter of knowing where they are and where they would like to be.”  <br /> <br /> Ruchotzke obtained her undergraduate degree from UW-Platteville, before earning her Master of Public Health degree from Concordia University in Nebraska. She said she jumped at the chance to come back to the university that held a special place in her heart. </span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span>“As an undergraduate student, I loved planning out what courses to take. Translating that into a job was something I have never considered until this position popped up on Indeed in 2016. I graduated from UW-Platteville in 2013, and having the opportunity to come back to a place I loved being simply made sense,” explained Ruchotzke.<br /> <br /> <span>Ruchotzke personally advises 245 students and is also responsible for coordinating online and print courses for campus students looking to take classes through the Center for Distance Operations. She said the best part of the job is playing a role in each student's academic journey.<br /> <br /> “</span>I enjoy hearing student stories and their experiences, where they are now, and how I can help them to get to where they want to go,” said Ruchotzke.<br /> <br /> The Wisconsin Academic Advising Awards recognize employees from a higher education institution in Wisconsin who demonstrate outstanding dedication to the profession of academic advising. Ruchotzke will be <span>formally honored at the 2020 WACADA conference, hosted virtually by the University of Wisconsin-Superior on Sept. 24.</span></span></span></span></p></div> Tue, 22 Sep 2020 11:45:31 +0000 Alison S Parkins 1292 at https://www.uwplatt.edu/news https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/uw-platteville-online-advisor-earns-award-excellence#comments Criminal Justice program recognized as one of the country's best online master's degrees https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/criminal-justice-program-recognized-one-countrys-best-online-masters-degrees <span property="schema:name">Criminal Justice program recognized as one of the country's best online master's degrees </span> <span rel="schema:author"><span lang="" about="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/user/14" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" xml:lang="">Alison S Parkins</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-09-03T18:10:24+00:00">Thu, 09/03/2020 - 13:10</span> <div class="field field--name-field-news-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/distance-education" hreflang="en">Distance Education</a></div> <div class="field--item"><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/law-justice" hreflang="en">Law & Justice</a></div> </div> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span>The University of Wisconsin-Platteville's reputation as a leader in distance education has been cemented again, as Online School Report recognizes the criminal justice program as one of the </span></span></span><span><span><span><a href="https://www.onlineschoolsreport.com/best-online-masters-in-criminal-justice/"><span><span><span>Best Online Master's Degrees in Criminal Justice</span></span></span></a></span></span></span><span><span><span><span> in the country.</span></span></span></span><br /> <br /> <span><span><span><span>The </span></span></span></span><span><span><span><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/master-criminal-justice"><span><span><span>Master's Degree in Criminal Justice</span></span></span></a></span></span></span> <span><span><span>program is uniquely designed to provide foundational knowledge in criminal justice systems, operations, and law for career mobility in the criminal justice field. Students also gain skills in organizational management, problem-solving, communications, and research. The master's program has three distinct emphases, designed to gain advanced knowledge and open the door to new opportunities: Criminal Justice Theory, Criminal Justice Management, Victim and Offender Services.<br /> <br /> "Our master's degree in criminal justice provides a solid foundation for those students interested in advance careers in the law enforcement, private security, or human service fields," <span><span>said Dr. Cheryl Banachowski-Fuller, program coordinator for the Master of Science in criminal justice.</span></span> "Importantly, with this earned degree, a career in one field can transition into the other."<br /> <br /> The program's focus on affordability and student success has been lauded by many other organizations as well, including recent accolades from </span></span></span><span><span><span><a href="https://www.gradschoolhub.com/best/best-online-masters-in-criminal-justice/"><span><span><span>Grad School Hub</span></span></span></a></span></span></span><span><span><span> and </span></span></span><span><span><span><a href="https://www.bestvalueschools.com/best-online-masters-in-criminal-justice-2019/"><span><span><span>Best Value Schools</span></span></span></a></span></span></span><span><span><span>.<br /> <br /> <span><span>"</span></span>Careers in criminal justice are many and continue to grow. In the current economic climate, job opportunities in advanced law enforcement, corrections and human services positions are competitive," said <span><span>Banachowski-Fuller</span></span>. "Departments tend to look for people with a military background or other prior leadership experience. Candidates with master's degrees stand out."<br /> <br /> Data shows the program has also been a sound investment for those who have earned the degree. <span><span>In fact, of the more than 400 graduates since 2019, an estimated 75-80% are working in supervisory and management positions. <br /> <br /> The Master of Science in Criminal Justice degree program was first offered at UW-Platteville in 1997 and has proven to be a vital part of the graduation education offerings. The 100% online program provides students with the flexibility to earn a degree at their own pace. To learn more about the program or to speak with an admissions specialist, </span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/program/master-criminal-justice"><span><span><span><span>click here</span></span></span></span></a></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span>.</span></span></span></span></span><br /> <br /> <br />  </p></div> Thu, 03 Sep 2020 18:10:24 +0000 Alison S Parkins 1250 at https://www.uwplatt.edu/news https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/criminal-justice-program-recognized-one-countrys-best-online-masters-degrees#comments Pioneer Profiles: Amy Foley https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/pioneer-profiles-amy-foley <span property="schema:name">Pioneer Profiles: Amy Foley</span> <span rel="schema:author"><span lang="" about="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/user/14" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="" xml:lang="">Alison S Parkins</span></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-08-26T17:36:58+00:00">Wed, 08/26/2020 - 12:36</span> <div class="field field--name-field-news-category field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/distance-education" hreflang="en">Distance Education</a></div> </div> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><em><span><span><span><span>Amy Foley is the Student Affairs Manager for the Center for Distance Learning, where she works to promote student development and the university community. She is also the latest <span><span><span><span><span>participant of the Division of Professional Studies’ Pioneer Profiles—a series of Q&A’s with members of the division’s dedicated staff. The following conversation details Amy’s thoughts on the importance of distance education and leadership, as well as the path she took to get</span></span></span> to where she is now. </span></span></span></span></span></span></em></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>You first joined the Center for Distance Learning in 2003 as a student assistant and have stayed with the department ever since, working up to your current position as the Student Affairs Manager. How has your experience shaped you as an advocate for distance learning?</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Seeing the success of all students is what makes me an advocate for distance learning.  I have worked with students who have overcome major life changes all while earning a degree.  In some situations, we have students coming to us for the second or third attempt at earning a degree (or earning their second or third degree). I admire their persistence and desire to achieve this goal. Many of these students would not have had this opportunity to earn or complete their degree if it were not for distance learning.</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>Are there any particular interests that have kept you with the CDL over the past 17 years?</span></span></span></strong><strong> </strong><strong><span><span><span>What do you enjoy most about working for this department? </span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>I would say the constant evolution of education and more specifically distance education is what keeps my interests. A lot has changed in the last 17 years as it relates to distance education.  I enjoy working through these changes and challenges with not only the staff within CDL but the entire university community.  </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>I also need to say that without a doubt the current and past staff within the CDL has kept me going these past 17 years as well.  I have learned and experienced so much through seeing the growth and development in our teams here. I absolutely need to give credit to our admissions, student services, and advising teams for making me the manager I am today. Witnessing their successes is an amazing experience and I am so grateful for their determination to succeed.  </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>In your opinion, what has been the most significant change that’s occurred within the department during your time here? </span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>We often joke that change is the one constant here, so it is really challenging to pick the most significant change.  Last year alone departments added a number of online undergraduate and graduate degrees for Fall 2019, and we kept talking “Fall 2019” as if it were a holiday and planning for these new programs months ahead of time. </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Then we welcomed 2020, the year of many challenges and changes for everyone.  Academically, departments added new online programs again, which really helps us reposition ourselves in the market and we also launched a new website.  However, we also had to work through our own personal and professional challenges associated with Covid-19.  We really rallied together to make sure everyone had what they needed to be successful. Despite Covid-19, we accomplished our goals and we are continuing to help our future and current students!</span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>As the Student Affairs Manager, what does a typical day look like for you? </span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>I spend a lot of my days balancing meetings in where we are planning and advocating for students and the university community, along with managing the admissions, student services, and advising teams on student development and individual student situations.  I don’t get a lot of one-on-one time with students within my role, however, so when I do get the opportunity, I take advantage of the time to learn more about the student and what their unique situations are.  </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>What is one important lesson you’ve learned or discovered while working for the CDL?</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>For me it is learning to value the uniqueness of the student as an individual. Each student has their own story to tell, their own passions, and their own drive to earn a degree.  This helps us better understand that education is not a one size fits all or even a one size fits most mold.  I believe this has helped me greatly when working through processes related to student status policies. We have to learn to be adaptable and flexible to the trends of higher education and more specifically distance education.  </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>How would you describe your leadership style? What, in your opinion, constitutes a good leader? </span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Many of my strengths are tied to relationship-building and influencing, so naturally I lean more toward a servant leadership style.  I bring a lot of empathy, foresight, and listening to the table when it comes to leadership and I find it easy to transition into other styles of leadership when needed. Not everyone or every situation responds to just one leadership style, so at times I may need to shake things up a bit and lead from a different direction.  </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>I have worked for and with many great leaders over the years. For those within a defined leadership position, I believe that making sure staff have what they need to be successful and trust in them is one of the most powerful leadership skills.  </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>What I really enjoy seeing is when those who are not in a defined leadership position transform into leaders. Perhaps it is for a project or a designated point in time, but watching staff move from followers to leaders and shift in-between the two is amazing.  </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>What is one fact people should know about you, and one fact that may surprise them?</span></span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>I have family and a large extended family that keeps me busy. Together we enjoy going on road trips and just seeing where the road takes us. If we can make it to some place obscure that makes it even better.  </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span>Something that may not be known about me is that I’m terrified of heights. When our last road trip took us to South Dakota, we drove the Needles Highway and at one stop I couldn’t even talk myself into getting out of the truck we were up so high.  Once on lower ground I was able to appreciate its beauty and wonder through our photographs.  As terrifying as it was, I would absolutely do it all over again.  </span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p> </p></div> Wed, 26 Aug 2020 17:36:58 +0000 Alison S Parkins 1226 at https://www.uwplatt.edu/news https://www.uwplatt.edu/news/pioneer-profiles-amy-foley#comments